Saturday, May 19, 2012

THE PERSIAN SCALE

I know what  you're thinking!

Nice man-bag... but why is your floor made of bacon?

Anyhow, moving on to why you probably found this... THE PERSIAN SCALE, unless you googled  "bacon, man-bag,"or something similar, then none of the dots below make any sense.
 
The PERSIAN Scale.

Not one that I've played with lots myself, but included for completeness...

THE PERSIAN SCALE is made of the following intervals: 1,b2,3,4,b5,b6,7.

The free guitar scale diagrams below lay out the scale for you all over the neck, as a four note per string three octave scale and as the seven three note per string patterns that will link together to let you play it all over the fretboard in any key.

If you love these kinds of sounds then you might also want to check out:

The Eight Note Spanish Scale. (1,b2,b3,3,4,b5,b6,b7.)
Spanish or Dominant Phrygian. (1,b2,3,4,5,b6,b7.)
The Phrygian Mode. (1,b2,b3,4,5,b6,b7.)

There are literally dozens of other possibilities, available on the site, and it's all free so just bookmark the site and explore some of the other options available.


 CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL THE FREE GUITAR RESOURCES ON MY BLOG!


4 comments:

  1. Where does this scale even come from? I'm looking at Persian music theory and I can't find anything like this!

    It looks vaguely like the Arabic Hijaz Kar (C Db E F G Ab B) but with the second tetrachord starting on F instead of G, but even then I can't find this on any list of Arabic, Turkish or Persian scales.

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    Replies
    1. I discovered it years ago in a book called "The Guitar Grimoire"
      It's Dominant/Spanish Phrygian with a major 7, which does I think make it feel even more exotic.
      The term "Persian Scale" has probably been historically applied given it's eastern sound.
      It may not necessarily be an authentic Arabic scale if you are talking about the study of authentic historical Arabic music, but I believe it has been used in music to give an Arabic feel.

      I guess what I'm saying is that even if the name is not strictly speaking truly authentic, it not inappropriate.

      A lot of the scales on here appear with different names in different musical contexts.

      Persian Scale was the name I observed being applied to this scale.

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